HISTORY OF CASKETS

There is an evolution of not just animals but belongings as well, everything being used on earth has a trace of where it also started and what brought about the use of it. I can remember that in the bible written about 2000 years ago that the dead body was rapped together with a piece of lining and kept in a tomb. Every family then has a tomb where they keep dead bodies.

A coffin is a box or casket used for keeping or preserving a corpse for burial function or cremation. The coffin was derived from an old French word meaning basket (coffin) which then became coffin in English, it’s modern French word is now coffin meaning cradle. Generally, the coffin is used to denote a six-sided or twelve-sided box and it has a one-piece side with a curve at the shoulder while a casket has four-sided or eight-sided that has joining instead of a curve. Any box used to bury the dead is known as coffin while a casket was initially used for jewelry box but then later introduced by the undertaker’s trade but then in recent times, caskets are referred to as a box with a split known as lid used for viewing the deceased either during funeral rites or in pictures.

The earlier wooden coffin remains were detected at 5000BC and it was found at the Beishoulding. Shaanxi, tomb 4. It was very visible evidence of tomb 152 in the early Banpo site which belonged to a 4-year-old girl. The thickness of a coffin is dependent on the number of timber frames in its composition because it also aids in the level of nobility emphasis.

A coffin could be buried either directly to ground placed in a burial vault or indirectly entombed above the ground in a church, catacombs or mosque. In countries like Indonesia, bodies were kept alongside longhouses while in the northern Sulawesi the deceased are kept above the ground Sacrophasicalled Warugabut this was practical during the 19th century. In Judaism culture, the coffins are made of wood basically, no metal ornaments are needed. The coffins are held together with pegs instead of nails. In China, coffins were made from woods resistant to decay such as sugi wood, incense-cedar wood. In Australia, adhesive as coffins. In Denmark, Moscow, and Beijing their coffins are constructed in such a way that there’s a permanent display of the corpse. In Japan coffins are used are barrels-like in shape and were usually used by coopers. Coffins contain handles metals handles at the side for easy carriage.